Magazine: Tourist Attractions Northwestern Canada

Winter 2017 (V11I4)

THINK LOCAL. SUPPORT LOCAL. BUY LOCAL.  The "buy local" movement has been a growing consumer trend over the past few years as people across Canada and the world look to support products and services offered right where they live. The Yukon is no exception. Yukoners have been creating new retail spaces and restaurants, forming new service providers, and developing locally produced foods and products. Continue reading

Editor's Note ~ Winter 2017

THINK LOCAL. SUPPORT LOCAL. BUY LOCAL. The “buy local” movement has been a growing consumer trend over the past few years as people across Canada and the world look to support products and services offered right where they live. The Yukon is no exception.   Yukoners have been creating new retail spaces and restaurants, forming new service providers, and developing locally produced foods and products. According to the 2015 Yukon Business Survey, sole proprietorships accounted for 43.8 percent of businesses in the territory and partnerships represented 8.7 percent of businesses. Of those sole proprietorships, 7.5 percent were Yukon First Nation owners. Continue reading

Editor's Note ~ Fall 2017

MUSINGS ON PATRIOTISM Earlier this year, The Walrus magazine’s cross-Canada speaker series, Walrus Talks: Conversations About Canada, began its tour in Whitehorse. A camera crew affiliated with the project approached my friend and me one night and asked us our impressions of Canada, what it means to be Canadian, and our hopes for the future.   As you must know by now, Canada hit the big ol’ 150 this year, which is what spurred on these discussions. As I pondered their questions, I had somewhat of a breakthrough moment: I realized I was more in touch with what it means to be Canadian since moving to the Yukon.   Even though I lived four years in the nation’s capital, Ottawa, and toured Parliament Hill, my higher learning in patriotism came when I left Ontario. That’s because until arriving in the North I hadn’t been properly introduced to different perspectives on our country, both dark and light. Continue reading

Fall 2017 (V11I3)

MUSINGS ON PATRIOTISM  Earlier this year, The Walrus magazine’s cross-Canada speaker series, Walrus Talks: Conversations About Canada, began its tour in Whitehorse. A camera crew affiliated with the project approached my friend and me one night and asked us our impressions of Canada, what it means to be Canadian, and our hopes for the future. Continue reading

Summer 2017 (V11I2)

EXPLORE THE LESSER KNOWN One of the intoxicating things about living in the North is the balance we achieve between some semblance of city life and being immersed in the great outdoors. Whitehorse has all the amenities one expects of a small capital: coffee shops, boutiques, banks, and nightlife. But, as I’ve written about in this space before, I’m grateful it’s only a short jaunt to leave all that behind and stare at a quiet lake surrounded by the vast boreal forest. Continue reading

Editor's Note ~ Summer 2017

EXPLORE THE LESSER KNOWN One of the intoxicating things about living in the North is the balance we achieve between some semblance of city life and being immersed in the great outdoors. Whitehorse has all the amenities one expects of a small capital: coffee shops, boutiques, banks, and nightlife. But, as I’ve written about in this space before, I’m grateful it’s only a short jaunt to leave all that behind and stare at a quiet lake surrounded by the vast boreal forest.   And while nature certainly exists within city limits, the theme of this issue is getting outside and exploring those lesser-known environments. As you’ll find in our feature articles, certain places may not be the average stop for locals or tourists, but the entire Yukon is deeply rooted in history as the traditional territory of the incredible First Nations people of the North. Continue reading

Featured Contributors ~ Summer 2017

KARA JOHANCSIK Kara is a Whitehorse-based writer who loves the outdoors. She feels incredibly lucky to live in a place where she can hike, ski, paddle remote Arctic rivers, and occasionally write stories about her adventures. Originally from Calgary, Alta., Kara also lived in Australia and B.C. before falling in love with the Yukon. MALKOLM BOOTHROYD Malkolm is a photographer, writer, and activist. He grew up in Whitehorse, but currently lives on Vancouver Island, where he studies geography and environmental studies at the University of Victoria. Malkolm was named one of YNoO’s “Top 10 Under 25” in the spring 2017 issue. MEG WALKER Meg is a writer and interdisciplinary visual artist. She is forever grateful that an artist residency in Dawson City introduced her to the North. Meg thrives on the way Yukon life generates conversations with people from all walks of life and leads to intriguing opportunities like writing about the Dawson City Firefighters Association.

REACHING THE DECADE MILESTONE I envy those who can recall childhood memories with ease. I don’t remember many specifics from when I was only one decade old, but I do have some pop-culture recollections from that time.   When I turned 10, I saved up my allowance to buy the first CD in my collection: Mariah Carey’s Music Box. It was 1993; films like Mrs. Doubtfire and Jurassic Park ruled the box office and the Toronto Blue Jays won their second World Series in a row when Joe Carter hit that three-run homer. Continue reading

Editor's Note ~ Spring 2017

REACHING THE DECADE MILESTONE I envy those who can recall childhood memories with ease. I don’t remember many specifics from when I was only one decade old, but I do have some pop-culture recollections from that time.   When I turned 10, I saved up my allowance to buy the first CD in my collection: Mariah Carey’s Music Box. It was 1993; films like Mrs. Doubtfire and Jurassic Park ruled the box office and the Toronto Blue Jays won their second World Series in a row when Joe Carter hit that three-run homer. Continue reading

NORTHERN SENSE OF ADVENTURE Perhaps American author William Feather was onto something when he wrote that line in his 1949 book The Business of Life. The word adventure can mean a lot of things, from travelling to various continents, seeking an adrenaline rush, or simply pushing yourself beyond your comfort zone in any aspect of life.   I don’t consider myself an extremely adventurous individual, which could be why I’ve always been astounded by the ... Click to read the entire Editor's Note.   Continue reading